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Les mammifères de Rians (Eocène inférieur, Provence)
Marc Godinot
Keywords: Eocene; Mammals; Provence; Rians
 
  Abstract

    The fossil mammals discovered in the quarry of Rians (Sparnacian, Provence) are described. Among these forms, Hyracotherium is interesting because of the little molarization of the lower premolars and its small size, and Diacodexis by its small size and very primitive astragalus ; they may be the most primitive representatives of their respective orders. Also, Proviverra eisenmanni n. sp. is the smallest and most primitive hyaenodontid yet described. Hyopsodus itinerans is the first species of this genus described France. Among other rare fossils is a new species of bat, a small palaeoryctid, and other forms not yet identified. Marsupials are varied. Several new species are present among the rodents. The fauna is well-balanced and rich in small hyopsodontid condylarths. It is stratigraphically situated at the
    Dormaal reference-level, at the base of the early Eocene, and is considered equivalent to the late Clarkforkian of North America. The hypothesis is presented that new forms appearing at the beginning of the Wasatchian in North America migrated, in fact, at that time from Europe.

      


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Published in Vol. 10, Fasc. 2 (1981)

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Anatomie du membre antérieur chez un chiroptère Molossidé (Tadarida sp.) du Stampien de Cereste (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence).
Bernard Sigé
Keywords: Chiroptera; Molossidae; Oligocene

doi: 10.18563/pv.4.1.1-38
 
  Abstract

    The present study describes in detail the anterior limb osteology of a molossid chiropteran of the genus Tadarida, from Céreste, a Stampian locality in the Apt-Forcalquier Oligocene basin already known for its fishes, plants and insects.

    A comparision with the Miocene forms T. srehlini from Saint-Géraud localities and T. sp. from Württemberg, also with the recent forms T. teniotis and Eumops perotis, does not show any clear morphological differences between the Tertiary and Recent Tadarida, indicating a rather noticeable anatomical stability, not exceptionnal indeed among Chiropterans. The Céreste fossil exhibits however slightly primitive wing proportions if compared to the Saint Gérand Aquitanian species.

    Several remarks deal with the peculiar relationships between the ecology of the molossids and their kind of fossilisation, frequently associated with sedimentary facies of the lacustrine type.
      


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 04, Fasc. 1 (1971)

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New records of terrestrial Mammals from the upper Eocene Qasr el Sagha Formation, Fayum Depression, Egypt
Patricia A. Holroyd, Elwyn L. Simons, Thomas M. Bown , Paul D. Polly and Mary J. Kraus
Keywords: Egypt; Eocene; Fossil mammals; Qasr el Sagha Formation
 
  Abstract

    New records of terrestrial mammals from the Qasr el Sagha Formation, Fayum Depression, Egypt are reported, and the stratigraphic occurrences of these fossils noted. These include additional specimens of Moeritheríum, Barytherium, and anthracotheres, as well as the oldest record of a hyracoid in the Fayum.These Eocene mammals occur almost exclusively in the alluvial deposits of the Dir Abu Lifa Member of the Qasr el Sagha Formation and show close affinities to the faunas from the lower sequence of the Jebel Qatrani Formation. There is no evidence of a more marked faunal discontinuity between the Qasr el Sagha and Jebel Qatrani Formations than there is across any of the three major breaks in sedimentation that exist within the Jebel Qatrani Formation. The faunal similarities between fossils of the lower sequence of the Jebel Qatrani Formation and of the upper part of the Qasr el Sagha Formation is consistent with recent paleomagnetic dating that suggests that these rocks differ in age by only one to two million years. 


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Published in Vol. 25, Fasc. 2-4 (1996)

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Mode de vie et affinités de Paschatherium (Condylarthra, Hyopsopontidae) d'après ses os du tarse
Marc Godinot, Thierry Smith and Richard Smith
Keywords: Astragalus; Calcaneum; Condylarthra; Eocene; Functional morphology; Paschatherium; Phylogeny
 
  Abstract

    Tarsals that can be confidently attributed to Paschatheríum dolloi from Dormaal (Belgium) are described. The astragalus is short; its broad neck is set at an angle of 30 degrees to the trochlea. The trochlea is pulley-shaped and proximally extended. There is no astragalar foramen. The medial tibial facet extends distally in a cup deeply excavated in the neck and buttressed. The sustentacular facet extends toward the navicular facet but is not fully confluent with it. The calcaneum bears a proximo-distally extended proximal facet for the astragalus. A relatively large peroneal tubercle projects from the body, and is situated distally. Functionally, the trochlea indicates extensive flexion-extension movements of the foot. Calcaneo-astragalar facets indicate sliding and rotation between the two tarsals. The inclination of the navicular facet suggests frequent foot inversion. The peroneal tubercle reflects good muscular capacities for foot rotation. Overall morphology is interpreted as a scansorial adaptation similar to that of sciurids.Comparisons are made with the tarsals of Macrocranion vandebroeki from Dormaal and Hyopsodus paulus from the Bridgerian of Wyoming. Some similarities between the astragali of Paschatherium and Macrocraníon (trochlea) are interpreted as convergences for rapid locomotion. However absence of mobility at the lower ankle and midtarsal joints in M. vandebroekzi suggests that this species was cursorial, as is known for M. tenerum from Messel. Similarities in the calcanea of Paschatherium and Hyopsodus are probably the result of close phylogenetic relations, and confirm the placement of Paschatherium in the hyopsodontids. The differences in the calcanea of Paschatherium and Macrocranion underline that Paschatherium is distinct from erinaceomorph insectivores. The differences in astragalar morphology between Paschatherium and Hyopsodus show that a marked adaptive divergence separates the two genera. We speculate about the common occurrence of a deep tibial cup (“cotylar fossa”) and a pulley-shaped trochlea in Paschatherium and hyracoids, suggesting that an adaptive scenario similar to that having led to Paschatherium (scansoriality) might explain the acquisition of the peculiar hyracoid tarsal characters; such a scenario contradicts the concept of Pantomesaxonia. Other peculiar characters of Hyopsodus suggest that hyopsodontids might be given more consideration in the search for hyracoid (and tethythere) origins. 


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Published in Vol. 25, Fasc. 2-4 (1996)

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Skeleton of early Eocene Homogalax and the origin of Perissodactyla
Kenneth D. Rose
Keywords: Eocene; Homogalax; Perissodactyla; Skeletal Anatomy
 
  Abstract

    The first good skeletal remains of Homogalax protapirinus from the Wasatchian of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, indicate that this primitive tapiromorph was more plesiomorphic in many features than primitive equoids including Hyracotherium. Compared to Hyracotherium, Homogalax more closely resembles Phenacodonta (the closest outgroup of Perissodactyla for which postcrania are known) in various details of articular surfaces, muscle attachments, and proportions of the humerus, manus, and pes.Among known taxa, Homogalax most nearly approximates the plesiomorphic postcranial skeletal anatomy of Perissodactyla. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 25, Fasc. 2-4 (1996)

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Un Haplobunodontidae nouveau Hallebune krumbegeli nov.gen. nov.sp. (Artiodactyla, Mammalia) dans l'Eocène moyen du Geiseltal près Halle (Sachsen-Anhalt, Allemagne)
Jorg Erfurt and Jean Sudre
Keywords: Artiodactyla; Geiseltal; Germany; Mammal; Middle Eocene; new gen.; new sp.
 
  Abstract

    A new genus and species of haplobunodontid artiodactyl, Hallebune krumbiegeli nov. gen. nov. sp., is described from the middle Eocene Geiseltal Fauna (Saxon-Anhalt, Germany). Its stratigraphic range is restricted to the MP 13 ("obere Mittelkohle") of the Geiseltalian. The material consists of seven fragments, representing both upper and lower jaws. It is indicated, that H. krumbiegeli was a small bunodont herbivore. The size and primitive character of the teeth suggest that the genus possibly is directly derived from Diacodexeidae.The new material forms the basis for reinterpreting the haplobunodontid phylogeny. 


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Published in Vol. 24, Fasc. 1-2 (1995)

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Contributions à l'étude du gisement Miocène supérieur de Montredon (Hérault). Les grands mammifères. 6 - Les périssodactyles Rhinocerotidae
Claude Guérin
Keywords: Aceratherium; anatomy; Biostratigraphy; Dicerorhinus; Miocene; Montredon; Paleoecology; Upper Vallesian
 
  Abstract

    The Montredon site has yielded about hundred rhinoceros remains:
    - twenty two of them, including 14 carpal and tarsal bones and 6 complete metapodials, belong to
    Dicerorhinus schleiermacheri at its second evolutionary stage;
    - fifty one remains including a nearby complete but crushed skull, a mandible, 26 isolated cheek-teeth, 10 carpals and tarsals, one metacarpal, are of Aceratherium incisivum, second evolutionary
    stage;
    - fifteen remains belong to Aceratherium (Alicornops) simorrense (among other an upper molar, 8 carpals and tarsals, one metatarsal);
    - six remains are attributed to an undetermined species of what is probably the most recent Prosantorhinus ever found.
    The evolution stages of the two first species allow us to date the deposit back to the Upper Vallesian, MN 10 zone; Montredon is one of the youngest sites in which Aceratherium simorrense was found. The four rhino species indicate a swampy forest biotope 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 18, Ext (1988)

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Analysis of mammalian communities from the late Eocene and Oligocene of southern France
Serge Legendre
Keywords: Late Eocene; Mammalian communities; Oligocene; Quercy; Southern France
 
  Abstract

    Valverde's cenogram method is used to analyse mammalian communities from the late Eocene to late Oligocene of southern France, mainly from the "Phosphorites du Quercy". Cenogram analysis involves plotting the size of each component species in a fauna on a semilog diagram in rank order, permitting fossil faunas to be compared with Recent ones. The configurations of Recent communities serve as models for establishing the general environmental characteristics of fossil mammalian faunas. This method of analysis applied to faunal sequence can reveal major and sudden ecological perturbations. The paleobiogeographical event (i.e. the mammalian immigration wave) at the Eocene-Oligocene Boundary in western Europe, known as the «Grande Coupure", is here shown to represent a drastic and sudden ecological change: late Eocene tropical environments in Europe deteriorated rapidly turning to subdesert or desert environments al the beginning of the Oligoccne. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 16, Fasc. 4 (1986)

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Henri Menu, 1925-2007
Bernard Sigé
Keywords: bats; biography

doi: 10.18563/pv.36.1-4.1-5
 
  Abstract

    Record of life and works of Henri Menu, French zoologist, contributor to the knowledge of living and fossil bats. 


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Published in Vol. 36, Fasc. 1-4 (2008)

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Strange Eocene rodents from Spain
Pablo Pelaez-Campomanes and Nieves Lopez-Martinez
Keywords: Biogeography; Eocene; Phylogeny; Rodents; Spain; Zamoramys extraneus n. gen. n. sp.
 
  Abstract

    A new European rodent from the middle Eocene of Spain, Zamoramys extraneus n. gen., n. sp., appears to be closely related to the middle Eocene chapattimyid rodents of Indo-Pakistan. This contradicts the generally accepted paleobiogeographic hypothesis of a Tethyian barrier between Europe and Asia isolating Europe during the middle Eocene. Because of this barrier, some authors have proposed that European and Asian rodents were not closely related, their similarity being the result of morphological convergence. Here monophyly has been tested, using the parsimony criterion, based on an analysis of dental characters (including discussing of homology and the validity of some characteristics). Our results indicate a phylogenetic relationship among the Asiatic Ctenodactyloidea, Zamoramys from Spain, and the European endemic Theridomyoidea. We also conclude from our analysis that theridomyoids and European ischyromyoids are probably not closely related phylogenetically. 


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Published in Vol. 25, Fasc. 2-4 (1996)

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The stratigraphic sequence of North American rodent faunas
Robert W. Wilson
Keywords: North America; Rodents; Stratigraphic sequence
 
  Abstract

    Rodents first appear in the latest Paleocene or earliest Eocene as very fragmentary specimens (Family Paramyidae) known largely from a single locality. After this sparse beginning, rodents are usually abundant in the North American record if proper recovery methods are used. Utilization of rodents for biostratigraphic purposes depends on 1/ extinction, and 2/ replacement by evolution of endemic groups and/or incursions of Old World rodents, and rarely and late by South American kinds. These incursions are separated by relatively long periods of isolation in the Paleogene, but more episodic in the Neogene. At least 10 rodent zones can be characterized by major distinctions, and these zones can be amplified into as many as 16 with little trouble. In general, rodent genera permit as refined a zonation as do genera of large mammals. Distinction at a specific level has not been attempted herein except in the Blancan and Post-Blancan. 


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Published in Vol. 9, Ext (1980)

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Révision systématique des Anchilophini (Palaeotheriidae, Perissodactyla, Mammalia).
Jean-Albert Remy
Keywords: Anchilophus; Eocene; new genus; new species; Palaeotheriidae; Paranchilophus; Perissodactyla; systematics

doi: 10.18563/pv.37.1-3.1-165
 
  Abstract

    The knowledge of the Anchilophini has been lately renewed by the discovery of a rather large amount of new material still largely unpublished. This new material offers the opportunity of a systematic revision of this tribe gathering those of European Eocene Equoidea which bear no mesostyle on upper check teeth and display a heavy trend to the molarization of premolars.

    A cladistic analysis has made out two genera, Anchilophus (Paranchilophus included as a subgenus), characterized by a marked lophodonty and the transverse narrowness of the cheek teeth, a rather high hypsodonty, the frequent occurrence of "crochets" and "anticrochets" on the superior ones, and a rather weak molarization of the premolars, opposite to Metanchilophus n. gen. whose cheek teeth are more transversally elongated, less high, less lophodont, with cusps better distinct, enamel thicker and premolars more molarized on the whole.

    Three species of Anchilophus are recognized, A. desmaresti, type species of the genus, A. (Paranchilophus) remyi and A. (Paranchilophus) jeanteli n. sp.

    The genus Metanchilophus is more diversified with the species dumasi, radegondensis, gaudini (whose a new sub-species M. g. fontensis is defined), depereli, castrensis n. sp. and chaubeti n. sp.

    The skull anatomy has been moreover described with several taxa; it brings to light (for all that one can generalize) that Anchilophini were light animals with a slender and elongated snout, a thin zygomatic arch, a rather developed encephalon with an advanced gyrencephaly.

    The structure of the nasal opening together with the occurrence of epitympanic sinuses and the molarizing process of the premolars corroborate the attribution of this tribe to the family PalaeotheIiidae. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 37, Fasc. 1-3 (2012)

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Les rongeurs de l' Eocène inférieur et moyen d'Europe Occidentale; Systématique, phylogénie, biochronologie et paléobiogéographie des niveaux-repères MP 7 à  MP 14.
Gilles Escarguel
Keywords: Biochronology; Early and Middle Eocene; Gliridae; Ischyromyidae; Mammalia; MP Scale; New Genus and Species; Palaeogeography; Phylogeny; Rodents; Theridomyidae; Western Europe
 
  Abstract

    Fourteen distinct phyletical lineages which belong at least in three families: Ischyromyidae ALSTON, 1876, Gliridae THOMAS, 1896 and Theridomyidae ALSTON, 1876, have been identified after the study of more than 3600 rodent dental remains from about twenty Early and Middle Eocene european localities. A systematical and phylogenetical revision of these rodents has been achieved. Nearly all the specific and generic diagnosis are emended. Several new combinations and synonymies are proposed. Four new species and two new genera, Euromys nov. (Ailuravinae) and Hartenbergeromys nov. (Microparamyini), are named and described. Euromys nov. gen. is known by three distinctive ypresian (MP 7 to MP 10 european reference levels) chronospecies. This new lineage is thought to be the direct ancestor of Meldimys MICHAUX, 1968 and Ailuravus RUTIMEYER, 1891. A new species of the genus Plesiarctomys BRAVARD, 1850, Pl. lapicidinarum from Condé-en-Brie (MP 8-9 reference level), allows to relate the Plesiarctomys lineage to the Pseudoparamys MICHAUX, 1964 one. The taxa Sparnacomys HARTENBERGER, 1971, Pantrogna HARTENBERGER, 1971, and Corbarimys MARANDAT, 1989 are erected to genus rank; the last one is not thought to be an Ischyromyidae. A new chronospecies of Pantrogna, P. marandati nov. sp. from the locality of Prémontré (MP 10 reference level), is described. This lineage is at the origin of two others, namely Masillamys TOBIEN, 1954, including M. mattaueri (HARTENBERGER, 1975) nov. comb. (MP 10 reference level), and Hartenbergeromys nov. gen., known from MP 10 (H. hautefeuillei nov. sp.) and MP 11 (H. parvus TOBIEN, 1954) reference levels. The phylogenetical position of Hartenbergeromys nov. gen., at the origin of the european family Theridomyidae, is discussed. The systematical and phylogenetical status of two probable Paramyinae, "Paramys" woodi MICHAUX, 1964 and an unnamed genus and species, are discussed. New populations of the primitive Gliridae Eogliravus HARTENBERGER, 1971 and of the primitive Theridomyidae Protadelomys HARTENBERGER, 1968, are described and assigned to previously known species.

      


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Published in Vol. 28, Fasc. 2-4 (1999)

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Leptacodon nascimentoi n,sp., un nouveau Nyctitheriidae (Mammalia,Lipotyphla) de l'Eocène inférieur de Silveirinha (Baixo Mondego, Portugal)
Carmen Estravis
Keywords: Eocene; Leptacodon; Lipotyphla; Mammals; Nyctitheriidae; Portugal; Silveirinha
 
  Abstract

    In this article is described a new species of Nyctitheriidae with primitive characters: Leptacodon nascimentoi n. sp. from the early Eocene of Silveirinha (Portugal). 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 25, Fasc. 2-4 (1996)

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Contributions à l'étude du gisement Miocène supérieur de Montredon (Hérault). Les grands mammifères. 7 - Les proboscidiens Deinotheriidae
Heinz Tobien
Keywords: allometry; Astaracian; Deinotherium; Montredon; systematics; taphonomy; Vallesian
 
  Abstract

    Some complete tooth rows and about one hundred isolated teeth enabled the identification of the deinothere of the Vallesian site Montredon (Hérault) as Deinotherium giganteum KAUP 1829, mainly by comparisons with the likewise Vallesian sample of the type locality Eppelsheim (Rheinhessen, F.R.G.).
    Scatterdiagrams of the teeth show the importance of allometry during the phyletic size increase of the European deinotheres.
    Some taphonomic problems of the Montredon deinothere are briefly mentioned. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 18, Ext (1988)

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The Pleistocene vertebrate fauna of Robinson Cave, Overton County, Tennessee
J. E. Guilday, H. W. Hamilton and A. D. Mc Crady
Keywords: Fauna; Mammalia; Pleistocene; Tennessee

doi: 10.18563/pv.2.2.25-75
 
  Abstract

    A late Pleistocene deposit of 60 species of vertebrates and 12 of invertebrates is described from Robinson Cave, Overton County, Tennessee, U.S.A. Forty-eight species of mammals are represented by at least 2,483 individuals; 10 % are extinct, 10 % occur in the state only as boreal relicts in the Great Smoky Mountains; 23 % no longer occur as far south as Tennessee; 57 % occur at or near the site today. Nínety-one percent of the Recent mammal species can be found living today in the Minnesota-Wisconsin area, approximately 10 degrees farther north. Fluorine analysis suggests a long period of accumulation. The following 10 mammalian species are recorded from Tennessee for the first time. Sorex arcticus, Microsorex hoyi, Citellus tridecemlineatus, Clethrionomys gapperi, Microtus pennsylvanicus, Synaptomys cooperi, Synaptomys borealis, Zapus nudsonius, Napaeozapus insignis, Martes americana. Six additional species are present as boreal relicts in the Great Smoky Mountains of eastern Tennessee but not at the site today : Sorex cinereus, Sorex dispar, Sorex palustris, Parascalops breweri, Glaucomys sabrinus, Mustela nivalis. Six forms are extinct: Canis dirus, Ursus americanus amplidens, Sangamona furtiva, Dasypus bellus, Mammut americanus,Megalonyx jeffersoni. Twenty-six additional species of mammals, all of the snails, birds, reptiles, and amphibians recovered from the fauna still inhabit the area today: The fauna is indicative of a cold-temperate climatic episode associated with the Wisconsin glaciation, but may be chronologically mixed. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 02, Fasc. 2 (1969)

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New Squalicorax species (Neoselachii: Lamniformes) from the Lower Maastrichtian of Ganntour phosphate deposit, Morocco
Henri Cappetta, Sylvain Adnet, Driss Akkrim and Mohammed Amalik
Keywords: Anacoracidae; Chondrichthyes; Maastrichtian; Morocco; New taxa

doi: 10.18563/pv.38.2.e3
 
  Abstract

    Two new Squalicorax species, S. benguerirensis nov. sp. and S. microserratus nov. sp. are described from the Lower Maastrichtian of the Benguérir phosphate open mine, Ganntour deposit, Morocco. The species S. benguerirensis nov. sp. was classically assigned to S. yangaensis since Arambourg (1952) and has been also recognized in coeval deposits from eastern USA to Mid-East. The species S. microserratus nov. sp. correspond to the lateral teeth of S. kaupi as reported by Arambourg (1952) and which is now referred in fact to S. bassanii. The comparison of these two new species with other Anacoracids, known in Moroccan or elsewhere, allows highlighting the great taxonomic and ecological diversities of this family during the Cretaceous.
      


  Article infos

Published in Vol.38-2 (2014)

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Agriotherium intermedium (Stach 1957) from a Pliocene fissure filling of Xiaoxian County (Anhuei Province, China) and the phylogenetic position of the genus.
Zhanxiang Qiu and Norbert Schmidt-Kittler
Keywords: Carnivora; China; Phylogeny; Pliocene; skull anatomy; Ursidae
 
  Abstract

    A fragmentary mandible and maxilla of a small sized Agriotherium of a young individual discovered from a Pliocene fissure filling in Xiaoxian county (Anhuei Province, China) are described. Judging from the morphology of the dentition and its dimensions the new material can be identified as Agriotherium inlermedium (STACH l957). Hendey's proposition (1980) that the Agriotherium species are derived from Indarctos is reconsídered on the basis of the new documents. As a result of a more general phylogenetic discussion it can be stated, that: 1. the supposed size increase as well as other trends, leading from Indarctos to Agriotherium are untenable ; 2. there are no positive indications to assume a phylogenetic transition of these two genera. 3. there are no real arguments in favor of an adaptational reversal in the evolution of Agriotherium. Hence, many features of that genus supposed by Hendey to be derived are plesiomorphic ; 4. regardless of the previous points it is methodologícally impossible to establish direct ancestor - descendant relationships between Indarctos and Agriotherium species, as Hendey did. Based on the data available and especially on the characters of the new material from China it is more likely that Agriotherium and Indarctos are two genera which developed independently. While advanced Agriotherium species, e.g. A. africanum, resemble in some respects Indarctos by adaptational analogies, more primitive species, e.g. Agriotherium intermedium, are quite dissimilar to lndarctos. While Indarctos might be derived from an Ursavus like forerunner, Agriotherium has its roots more likely somewhere in between Ursavus and the Hemicyon-group. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 13, Fasc. 3 (1983)

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Arvicolinae (Rodentia) du Pliocène terminal et du quaternaire ancien de France et d'Espagne.
Jacques Michaux
Keywords: Arvicolinae; France; Pleistocene; Pliocene; Spain

doi: 10.18563/pv.4.5.137-214
 
  Abstract

    Two steps can be distinguished in the history of the first invasion of western and south western Europe by the arvicolines. The first step corresponds to the installation of these rodents with the immigration of Promimonys inxuliferus Kowalski, then of Mimomys stehlini Kormos and of Mimomys gracilis (Kretzoi). The second is characterized by the establishment of a geographic differentiation in the arvicoline fauna between the south of France and Spain, from where are described new species of Mimomys (Mimamys cappettai, Mimomys septimanus, Mimonys medasensis), and the rest of France, where are found only elements already known from central Europe or England (Mimomys polonicus Kowalski, Mimomys pliocaenicus F. Major, Mimomys reidi Hinton, or forms very close to the latter). This geographic differentiation, which is very certainly the consequence of the division of Europe into distinct climatic provinces, one of them being the southern province comprising at least Spain and southern France, could result from a cladogenetic evolution of Mimomys stehlini and Mimomys gracilis after their immigration. The present work is also a contribution to the search for correlations between the diverse micromammal localities of the latest Pliocene (or early Villafranchian) and of the early Quaternary of Europe. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 04, Fasc. 5 (1971)

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Les gangas (Aves, Columbiformes, Pteroclidae) du Paléocène et du Miocène inférieur de France.
Cécile Mourer-Chauviré
Keywords: Birds; evolution; Lower Miocene; New taxa; Oligocene; Paleoecology; Paulhiac; Quercy phosphorites; Saint-Gérand-Ie-Puy; Sandgrouse; Upper Eocene
 
  Abstract

    The two species of Sandgrouse from Quercy, Pterocles validus MILNE-EDWARDS and P. larvatus MILNE-EDWARDS, are ascribed to the genus Archaeoganga MOURER-CI-IAUVIRÉ which includes a third, very large species, A. pinguis. The sandgrouse of Saint-Gérand-le-Puy, Pterocles sepultus MILNE-EDWARDS, is ascribed to a new genus, Lepzoganga. This form appears in the Upper Oligocene of Quercy, in Pech Desse and Pech du Fraysse localities, and is still present in the Lower Miocene of Saint-Gérand-le-Puy and Paulhiac. Recent sandgrouse live in semidesert or desert areas. The indications provided by mammal and bird faunas in the localities where sandgrouse were found, confirm that the paleoenvironment was open and arid. The morphological study of these fossils indicates that, in the Upper Eocene, the Pteroclidae were already completely individualized with respect to Charadriiformes.
      


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 22, Fasc. 2-3 (1993)

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