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Les Bovidae (Artiodactyla, Mammalia) du Miocène moyen de la formation Hofuf (Province du Hasa, Arabie Saoudite).
Herbert Thomas
Keywords: Biostratigraphy; Bovidae; Middle Miocene; Palaeogeography; Saudi Arabia
 
  Abstract

    The study of the bovids from Al Jadidah (Hofuf Formation, Saudi Arabia) confirms that the fauna comes from a pre-Hipparion level. The Al Jadidah age is close to that of Fort Ternan (14 m.y.) and Beni Mellal, but cannot be older than that of Fort Ternan. The age of the Hofuf Formation is close to but slightly older than the oldest deposits of the Ngorora Formation (Kenya). 7 to 9 species have been recorded, of which 2 to 4 remain indeterminate. If the great specific diversity of te bovids from this locality gives evidence of immigrations from anterior Asia (Turkey) (e.g. Pachytragus Iigabuei sp. nov.), the bovid assemblage of Al Jadidah results in fact from a double influence: from the anterior Asia and mainly from Africa (e.g. the Caprotragoides lineage and the Neotragini? Homoiodorcas). The Al Jadidah bovids reflect, on the whole, the predominant character of open to very open environment, which supports the conclusions drawn from our two preliminary studies. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 13, Fasc. 5 (1983)

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La poche à Phosphate de Ste-Néboule (Lot) et sa faune de vertebres du Ludien supérieur. 6- Oiseaux
Cécile Mourer-Chauviré
Keywords: Eocene; Quercy phosphorites
 
  Abstract

    There are very few birds in the site of Sainte-Néboule. They belong to three species already known in the "Phosphorites" : Paraortyx brancoi, Aegialornis broweri, Cypselavus gallicus, and to one new species, Recurvirostra santaeneboulae. The comparison of some different bones of the genus Cypselavus with some Apodiformes and Caprimulgiformes shows that this genus must be classified in the order Apodiformes. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 08, Fasc. 2-4 (1978)

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Revision of the family Cephalomyidae (Rodentia, Caviomorpha) and new cephalomyids from the early Miocene of Patagonia.
Alejandro Kramarz
Keywords: Cephalomyidae; Lower Miocene; Patagonia; Rodentia; Soriamys; systematics
 
  Abstract

     A new genus of hystricognath rodent with two new species, Soriamys gaimanensis and Soriamys ganganensis, from the Colhuehuapian Age (Early Miocene), Sarmiento Formation, of Patagonia is described. The first species comes from the south barranca of the valley of Rio Chubut, near Gaiman locality (Chubut Province). It is known through a great number of dental remains in different stages of wear. The teeth are protohypsodont, with cement in the principal valleys. P4 are simpler, more oval inoutline and without a differentiated hypocone-hypoflexus. Upper molars are pentalophodont in early stages of wear and become bilobated in middle and advanced stages; M3 have a temporary third posterior lobe due to the maintenance of the braquiflexus on the posterior wall of the tooth. Lower teeth have a completely asymrnetrical pattern in relation to the uppers. The molars are trilophodont, with only one complex crest in the trigonid composed of the fusion of the anterolophid and mesolophid. The dp4 have a derived pentalophodont pattern due to the loss or fusion of the mesolophid and the development of an accessory transverse crest between the anterolophid and metalophid. The second species is known through a complete skull and jaw and other skull fragments with the dentition, proceeding from Pampa de Gan Gan, Chubut province. Respect to the first species, the teeth are higher crowned, with an earlier occlusal simplification and a third posterior lobe of M3 more developed and persistent. The skull and jaws show many chinchilloid characters, such as jugal bone with an ascending process, concave palate, very prominent dorsal shelf of the masseteric fossa, nasolachrymal duct opened laterally on the maxillary and very developed lateral mandibular fossa. Moreover, Soriamys is closely related to Cephalomys by sharing a similar asymmetric dental pattern and other dental and mandibular characters. These two genera constitute a natural group, the Cephalomyidae, with peculiar dental characters, like the asymmetric pattem of the upper and lower teeth; Cephalomyopsis, and probably Litadontomys, can be considered part of this group. Scotamys and Perimys constitute a distinct lineage (the Neopiblemidae or Perimyidae), more closely related to the chinchillids. Many characters shared by cephalomyids, eocardiids and caviids suggest a closer affinity between the Chinchilloidea and the Cavioiidea as a whole. Abrocoma shows also an asymmetric dental pattern and other chinchilloid features that suggest some degree of relationship with the cephalomyids, still not well determined. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 30, Fasc. 1-2 (2001)

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Premières données sur les carnivores fissipèdes provenant des fouilles récentes dans le Quercy
Louis de Bonis
Keywords: Carnivores; Quercy phosphorites
 
  Abstract

    Abstract not available 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 06, Fasc. 1-2 (1974)

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Présence de Palaeobatrachidae (Anura) dans des gisements tertiaires Français caractérisation, distribution et affinités de la famille
Colette Vergnaud-Grazzini and Robert Hoffstetter
Keywords: Anura; Palaeogeography; systematics
 
  Abstract

    The Palaeobatrachidae until now have not been reported from France. The present note makes known the discovery of very significant remains in three Tertiary localities of France: Cernay (late Paleocene), Laugnac (late Aquitanian) and Sansan (middle Helvetian). The osteologic characters, as well as the geographic and stratigraphic distribution of the family are re-stated with added details. The Palaeobatrachidae are a European family known from the late Jurassic of Catalonia (publication in course by J. Seiffert) to the Plio-Pleistocene (pre-Mindel) of Poland and Rumania. By their way of life and certain osteologic characters they are similar to the Pipidae, but they are distinguished by profound differences. It would be rash to include them in the Pipoidea or even in the Aglossa. They are apparently an independant group, essentially holarctic, which held in Europe a role equivalent to that played by the Pipidae south of Tethys. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 05, Fasc. 4 (1972)

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Contributions à l'étude du gisement Miocène supérieur de Montredon (Hérault). Les grands mammifères. 6 - Les périssodactyles Rhinocerotidae
Claude Guérin
Keywords: Aceratherium; Anatomy; Biostratigraphy; Dicerorhinus; Miocene; Montredon; Paleoecology; Upper Vallesian
 
  Abstract

    The Montredon site has yielded about hundred rhinoceros remains:
    - twenty two of them, including 14 carpal and tarsal bones and 6 complete metapodials, belong to
    Dicerorhinus schleiermacheri at its second evolutionary stage;
    - fifty one remains including a nearby complete but crushed skull, a mandible, 26 isolated cheek-teeth, 10 carpals and tarsals, one metacarpal, are of Aceratherium incisivum, second evolutionary
    stage;
    - fifteen remains belong to Aceratherium (Alicornops) simorrense (among other an upper molar, 8 carpals and tarsals, one metatarsal);
    - six remains are attributed to an undetermined species of what is probably the most recent Prosantorhinus ever found.
    The evolution stages of the two first species allow us to date the deposit back to the Upper Vallesian, MN 10 zone; Montredon is one of the youngest sites in which Aceratherium simorrense was found. The four rhino species indicate a swampy forest biotope 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 18, Ext (1988)

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Contributions à l'étude du gisement Miocène supérieur de Montredon (Hérault). Les grands mammifères. 8 - Analyse paléoécologique de la faune mammalienne
Serge Legendre
Keywords: France; Mammalia; Montredon; Paleoecology; Upper Miocene
 
  Abstract

    The species diversity of the mammalian fauna from Montredon (Hérault, France, late Miocene) is examined in terms of richness and abundance. A cenogramic analysis of the fossil mammalian community suggests the prevalence of open habitats, with the presence of marshes and of a poorly developed galery forest, and a climate rather warm and dry. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 18, Ext (1988)

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Palaecarcharodon orientalis (Sinzow) (Neoselachii : Cretoxyrhinidae), from the Paleocene of maryland, USA.
Gerard R. Case
Keywords: Maryland; Palaeocarcharodon; Paleocene; Selachian; systematics; U.S.A.
 
  Abstract

    Recent collecting of fossil vertebrate remains from the lowermost member of the Aquia Formation (Paleocene), has enabled me to report here for the very fIrst time, the earliest occurrence for the teeth of Palaeocarcharodon in the fossil record of the New World.
    This report represents only one species of neoselachian from this locality, the remaining fauna of which will subsequently be described. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 19, Fasc. 1 (1989)

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Palaeotis weigelti restudied : a small middle Eocene Ostrich (Aves : Struthioniformes)
Peter Houde and Hartmut Haubold
Keywords: Aves; Central Europe; Middle Eocene; Palaeotis; Struthioniformes
 
  Abstract

    Palaeotis weigelti, from the Middle Eocene of central Europe, is a flightless, paleognathous bird. It appears to be a member of the ostrich lineage on the basis of trivial derived characters. It is a very primitive ratite, however, and does not possess any of the highly specialized cursorial adaptations that characterize the modern steppe -and savanna- dwelling ostriches. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 17, Fasc. 2 (1987)

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The eosimiid and amphipithecid primates (Anthropoidea) from the Oligocene of the Bugti hills (Balochistan, Pakistan): new insight into early higher primate evolution in South Asia.
Laurent Marivaux
Keywords: Amphipithecidae; anthropoid phylogney; Bugti Hills; Early Oligocene; Eosimiidae; Pakistan
 
  Abstract

    Eosimiid and amphipithecid primates document a long and significant history of primate evolution throughout the Eocene in Southeast Asia. Despite the absence of a comprehensive post-Eocene fossil record, it was generally hypothesized that both families left no descendant in Asia. Recently, two new small-bodied taxa, Bugtipithecus and Phileosimias, have been recovered in early Oligocene coastal deposits from the Bugti Hills (Balochistan, central Pakistan) and referred to the families Amphipithecidae and Eosimiidae, respectively, on the basis of dental fossil remains. In this paper, we provide more exhaustive description, comparison, and discussion of these taxa. As for tarsiid and sivaladapid primates, the persistence of eosimiids and amphipithecids into the Oligocene clearly demonstrates that low latitudes of South Asia provided a continuous access to tropical refugia during the climatic deterioration characterizing the late Eocene-early Oligocene interval, which was seemingly lethal for primate communities elsewhere across the Holarctic continents. As a contribution to the ongoing phylogenetic debates regarding the position of eosimiids and amphipithecids on the primate family tree, we have performed a cladistic analysis in a high-level primate systematic context in order to assess the position and the role of these new taxa in that phylogenetic issue. Our results support the view according to which eosimiids and amphipithecids (and by extension Phileosimias and Bugtipithecus, respectively) are stem anthropoids. These fossils from Pakistan document an unsuspected Oligocene phase of the evolutionary history of anthropoid primates in southern Asia, which clearly enhances the extent of the anthropoid radiation in this province during the Paleogene. Several phylogenetic and paleobiogeographic aspects are discussed, notably the intra- and inter-relationships between Paleogene Asian and Afro-Arabian anthropoids, and the resulting potential dispersal models between both land-masses during the Paleogene. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 34, Fasc. 1-2 (2006)

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Les mammifères Montiens de Hainin (Paléocène moyen de Belgique) Part II : Les Condylarthres
Jean Sudre and Donald E. Russell
Keywords: Belgium; Condylarths; Louisininae; Oxyclaeninae; Paleocene
 
  Abstract

    The Condylarths from Hainin (Hainault, Belgium) show no affinity at the generic level to those known in other Paleocene localities of Europe and North America ; they are described as new forms : Monshyus praevius n. gen., n. sp. and Prolatidens waudruae n. gen., n. sp. Monshyus praevius, discovered in only one of the levels in the excavation at Hainin, is similar to the genera Microhyus TEILHARD and Louisina RUSSELL ; with them it is included in the subfamily Louisininae (Hyopsodontidae). With respect to Microhyus and Louisina, Monshyus is distinguished by the precociously modern aspect of its upper molars, the only teeth that are referable. Prolatidens waudruae, known only by lower molars, was found in several levels in the pit at Hainin. It is an arctocyonid presenting possible relationships to the North American form Oxyprimus galadrielae ; it therefore has been provisionally attributed to the subfamily Oxyclaeninae. If this attribution is confirmed, this species will constitute the first and only representative of the group in Europe. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 12, Fasc. 6 (1982)

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Les mammifères Montiens de Hainin (Paléocène moyen de Belgique) Part III : Marsupiaux
Jean-Yves Crochet and Bernard Sigé
Keywords: Belgium; Marsupials; Paleobiogeography; Paleocene
 
  Abstract

    The oldest european marsupials are described from some specimens (isolated upper molars) recently found from the Hainin sediment (Middle Paleocene of Belgium). These fossils document a new species of the Peradectes genus. They give evidence of a much older occurrence of the marsupials in Europe than it was assumed. They allow us to postulate a didelphid dispersal from South America towards the western-holarctic area operating in two phases : the first one of the Peradectes genus at the end of the Cretaceous; the second one of the Didelphíni tribe at the end of the Paleocene. A central american crossing is likely for the first one,  whereas a transafrican way is tentatively argued for the second one. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 13, Fasc. 3 (1983)

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Cricetid rodents from Siwalik deposits near Chinji village. Part I: Megacricetodontinae, Myocricetodontinae and Dendromurinae.
Everett H. Lindsay
Keywords: Dendromurinae; Megacricetodontinae; Middle Miocene; Myocricetodontinae; Rodents; Siwalik
 
  Abstract

    Seventeen species of cricetid rodent are recognized and described from lower and middle Siwalik deposits in the Potwar Plateau of Pakistan. These species are grouped in three categories, characterized as subfamilies (e. g., Megacricetodontinae, Myocricetodontinae, and Dendromurinae); an additional and more abundant category of rodents from these deposits, the Democricetodontinae, is excluded from this study, and will be described in a later study. Fifteen of the species are new, and four new genera are described. The Siwalik cricetid taxa are : Megacricetodon aquilari, n. sp.; Megacricetodon sivalensis, n. sp.; Megacricetodon daamsi, n. sp.; Megacricetodon mythikos, n. sp.; Punjabemys downsi, n. gen. & n. sp.; Punjabemys leptos, n. gen. & n. sp.; Punjabemys mikros, n. gen. & n. sp.; Myocricetodon sivalensis, n. sp.;  Myocricetodon sp.; Dakkamyoides lavocati, n. gen. & n. sp.; Dakkamyoides perplexus, n. gen. & n. sp.; Dakkamys asiaticus, n. sp.; Dakkamys barryi, n. sp.; Dakkamys sp.; Paradakkamys chinjiensis, n. gen. & n. sp.; Potwarmus primitivus, n. gen.; and Potwarmus minimus, n. gen. & n. sp. This diverse record of middle Miocene small mammals illuminates a profound radiation of cricetid rodents in southem Asia, the effects of which were felt in Europe and Africa as well as the rest of Asia. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 18, Fasc. 2 (1988)

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Rongeurs du Miocène inférieur et moyen en Languedoc. Leur apport pour les correlations Marin-Continental et la Stratigraphie.
Jean-Pierre Aguilar
Keywords: Languedoc; Miocene; Rodents; Southern France
 
  Abstract

    The rodents (Cricetidae, Gliridae, Sciuridae) found in lacustrine, brackish marine and karstic sediments of Miocene age in Languedoc, assign the position of the different localities in the scale of "niveaux repères" used by mammalogists. Some detailed stratigraphical studies bring several correlations between this continental biochronological scale and the marine scale ; the most important results are the Aquitanian age of the "niveaux repères" of Coderet and Paulhiac, the Burdigalian age of Laugnac, Estrepouy, Vieux-Collonges, La Romieu and Sansan and the Langhian or Lower Serravallian age of La Grive M. The correlations between the Tethys and the Central Paratethys for the Lower Neogene profit also of these results, since the locality of Neudorf Spalte 1, 2 (Czechoslovakia) is shown to be younger than Sansan (France). The paleontological study has also several geological inferences for the Miocene of Languedoc ; with the calibration of this Miocene, we know quite precisely that the Lower Miocene is chiefly a time lacustrine sedimentation, and also that the marine Miocene sedimentation ends early in the Miocene Period, in Langhian or lower Serravallian times. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 09, Fasc. 6 (1980)

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Sur le plus ancien Lagomorphe Européen et la "Grande Coupure" Oligocène de Stehlin
Nieves Lopez-Martinez and Louis Thaler
Keywords: Grande Coupure; Lagomorphe; Oligocene
 
  Abstract

    Pour la première fois un spécimen de lagomorphe a été récolté en Quercy. L'intérêt de ce fossile tient surtout à son âge géologique inattendu, qui recule considérablement la date de première apparition en Europe de cet ordre de mammifère, Ceci nous paraît justifier une nouvelle réflexion sur la « grande coupure» oligocène, 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 06, Fasc. 3-4 (1975)

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Dilambodont Molars :a functional interpretation of their evolution
Percy M. Butler
Keywords: Convergent evolution; Dilambdodont; Molar function; Molar teeth
 
  Abstract

    In dilambdodont molars the primitive crest between paracone and metacone (centrocrista) is represented by a pair of crests that join the mesostyle (postparacrista, premetacrista). The cutting action of these crests against the crests of the hypoconid is described. Dilambdodonty is a derived adaptation for greater cutting efficiency. It has evolved several times and in more than one way. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 25, Fasc. 2-4 (1996)

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Artiodactyla from the early Eocene of Kyrgyzstan
Alexander Averianov
Keywords: Artiodactyla; Asia; Diacodexeidae; Eocene; Kyrgyzstan
 
  Abstract

    Isolated upper cheek teeth of the primitive artiodactyl Diacodexis sp., upper molars of Eolantianius russelli gen. et sp. nov. (Diacodexeidae), two lower molars tentatively referred to Eolantianius russelli gen. et sp. nov., and astragali of Diacodexeidae indet. are described from the early Eocene (late Ypresian) of locality Andarak 2 in Kyrgyzstan. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 25, Fasc. 2-4 (1996)

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New murids and gerbillids (Rodentia, Mammalia) from Pliocene Siwalik sediments of India.
Rajeev Patnaik
Keywords: dental morphology; evolution; new species of murids and gerbillids; phylogenetic relationships; systematics
 
  Abstract

    Murids and gerbillids (Rodentia, Mammalia) recovered from four Upper Siwalik localities; Moginand (around 3.5-4.5 m.y.), Kanthro (around 2.5 m.y.), Ghaggar (around 2 m.y.) and Nadah (around 1.8-2 m.y.) are described herein. A comparison of Mus linnaeusi sp. nov. reveals its close relationship towards the house mouse Mus musculus. In contradiction to earlier proposals that Golunda migrated to the Indian subcontinent from Africa sometime during Late Pliocene, it is suggested here that Golunda (in the form of Golunda tatroticus sp. nov.) evolved from Parapelomys robertsí of Late Miocene deposits of Siwaliks. Golunda tatroticus sp. nov. exhibits a progressive relationship to the extant Indian Bush Rat Golunda ellioti through Golunda kelleri and Golunda sp. Tatera pinjoricus sp. nov. is considered here to be a link between the extinct Abudhabia kabulense and the extant Tatera indica.

      


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 26, Fasc. 1-4 (1997)

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Rongeurs du Miocène supérieur de Chorora (Ethiopie): Cricetidae, Rhizomyidae,Phiomyidae, Thryonomyidae,Sciuridae.
Denis Geraads
Keywords: cricetids; Ethiopia; phiomyids; rhizomyids; Rodentia; sciurids; thryonomyids; Upper Miocene
 
  Abstract

    Besides Dendromurids and Murids, the Chorora Rodents include 7 taxa, two of which are new. Afaromys nov. gen. is a Cricetodontine with very complicated lower molars, certainly isolated for a long time from Eurasian species. A Paraphiomys, with tetralophodont upper molars, is also quite different from other East African species, and its roots should probably he searched in the middle Miocene. Other taxa are less original, and more similar to the South Asiatic ones. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 27, Fasc. 3-4 (1998)

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La variabilité morphologique dentaire du Landenodon (Condylarthra) de Dormaal, (Eocène,Belgique)
Marc Godinot
Keywords: Condylarths; Dormaal; Early Eocene; Landenodon
 
  Abstract

    The study of dental variations in Landenodon from Dormaal (early Eocene, Belgium) shows that only one
    species is present in this locality : L. woutersi QUINET, 1968 (Condylarthra, Arctocyonidae, Arctocyoninae). A high morphological variability is described, especially concerning the metaconid of P/4, the paraconid of M/2, and some characters of M1/ which have been found to be independant of each other. This variability is discussed. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 9, Ext (1980)

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