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First record of the genus Megaderma Geoffroy (Microchiroptera: Megadermatidae) from Australia.
Suzanne J. Hand
Keywords: Australia; Chiroptera; Megaderma; Megadermatidae; Pliocene; Rackham's Roost Site; Riversleigh
 
  Abstract

    A new Tertiary megadermatid is described from Rackham's Roost Site, a Pliocene limestone cave deposit on Riversleigh Station, northwestern Queensland, Australia. It appears to represent the first Australian record of Megaderma GEOFFROY, 1810, a genus otherwise known from Tertiary African and European taxa and the living Asian species M. spasma (LINNAEUS, 1758) and M. (Lyroderma) lyra PETERS, 1872. Megademza richardsi n. sp. is one of the smallest megademiatids known. It exhibits a mixture of plesiomorphic and autapomorphic features, the latter appearing to exclude it from being ancestral to any living megadermatid. The new species is one of eight megadermatids identified from the Australian fossil record, most of which are referable to Macroderma MILLER, 1906. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 24, Fasc. 1-2 (1995)

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Morphotypes dentaires actuels et fossiles des chiroptères vespertilionines. 2ème partie: implications systématique et phylogéniques.
Henri Menu
Keywords: Chiroptera; Phylogeny; systematics; Vespertilionine
 
  Abstract

    The first part of this study was devoted to a descriptive analysis of teeth morphologies among the vespertilionine bats. This leads now to a tentative synthesis, providing views on the systematics of the group. The results could be seen according to three distinct but closely related purposes : 1 - the sorting of the genera contents in order to conform the genera units to homogeneous taxa that could represent natural issues of evolutionary lineages ; 2 - the investigation of relationships between extant genera in order to infer the possibilities of common origin ; 3 - according to the preceeding items and to the observed evolutionary trends, a tentative phylogeny, modest and cautious. The contents of many genera are sorted : Leuconoe is removed from subgeneric to generic position, whereas Myotis becomes a subgenus of it ; the myotodont species are cleared away from the Pipistrellus genus ; Glischropus and Scotozous are synonymized within Pipistrellus ; Hypsugo is raised to the generic level ; some species previously ranged within Pipistrellus will form provisionally a collective group, Attalepharca nov. ; the Eptesicus genus is broken up, the excluded species being grouped within Nycterikaupius gen. nov. ; the Nycticeini tribe is defined again after exclusion of Otonycteris , Scotoecus, Scotophilus , and addition of Hesperoptenus ; the species la io and Pipistrellus tasmaniensis are removed to Eptesicus (n.s.) and Pipistrellus dormeri to Scotoecus. Groupings of genera are stated according to the main evolutionary trends of I1/. The relevance of these is often warranted by close morphologic similarities of other teeth. This leads to a recognition of the major evolutionary radiations which occurred in the group. The filiations schematized at the end of the work show the dental relationships observed between the extant genera, and could represent a phylogenic framework. Two major facts are to be underlined : 1- the early divergence of leuconoids ; 2 - the successives crossings to myotodonty from the nyctaloid flow. Fossil data from the literature are punctually and tentatively incorporated within phylogenic sketches. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 17, Fasc. 3 (1987)

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Macroscelidea, Insectivora and Chiroptera from the Miocene of east Africa.
Percy M. Butler
Keywords: Chiroptera; East Africa; Insectivora; Macroscelidea; Miocene; systematics
 
  Abstract

    The East African Miocene Macroscelidea, lnsectivora and Chiroptera are revised on the basis of new material. New taxa proposed are: Miorhynchocyon, .n. gen. (Macroscelididae): Míorhynchocyon meswae, n. sp.: Pronasílío ternanensis. n. gen.. n. sp. (Macroscelididae); Hiwegicyon juvenalis, n. gen. n. sp. (Macroscelididae); Parageogale, n. gen. (Tenrecidae): Prochrysochlorinae, n. subfam. (Chrysochloridae): Propottininae, n. subfam, (Pteropodidae); Chamtwaria pickfordi, n. gen., n. sp. (Vespertilionidae). Gymnurechnínus songhorensis is synonymised with G. camptolophus. The new material provides additional information on the dentition, especially of Myohyrax oswaldi. Galerix africanus. Amphechínus rusingensis, Protenrec tricuspis and Parageogale aletris. Partial skulls are described of Amphechinus rusingensis, Protenrec tricuspis, Prochrysochloris míocaenicus and Taphozous incognita. The oldest member of the Macroscelidinae (Pronasilio) is described from Fort Ternan. Galerix africanus is closely related to G. exilis from Europe. Amphechinus rusingenesis is compared with Asiatic Oligocene Erinaceinae. The Miocene age of Crocidura is rejected. On the evidence of humeri, the following families of Chiroptera are newly reported: Pteropodidae, Nycterididae, Vespertilionidae, Molossidae. Propotto is regarded as an offshoot from the Pteropodidae, not ancestral to modern forms. Chamtwaria is a primitive vespertilionoid, provisionally placed in the Kerivoulinae. Erinaceidae probably entered Africa at the beginning of the Miocene, before 20 Ma. Faunistic differences between deposits are largely to be ascribed to differences in local environment. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 14, Fasc. 3 (1984)

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An Australian Miocene Brachipposideros (Mammalia, Chiroptera) related to Miocene representatives from France
Bernard Sigé, Suzanne J. Hand and Michael Archer
Keywords: Australia; bats; Chiroptera; Miocene
 
  Abstract

    A new middle Miocene hipposiderid bat is described from a limestone deposit on Riversleigh Station in north-western Queensland. Hipposideros (Brachipposideros) nooraleebus n. sp. is the first record of this subgenus from anywhere in the world outside of France. The palaeoecological setting of the fossil bats appears to have been a relatively quiet, sunny lime-enriched tropical pool that contained tortoises, crocodiles and fish. It is possible that the bats were washed into the pool from an adjacent cave.
    The Riversleigh bat most closely resembles the French Burdigalian (early middle Miocene) bat H. (B.) aguilari. It is also possible that it may have been closely related to the original Australian hipposiderid stock that ultimately gave rise to the endemic monotÿpic Rhinonycteris aurantius. The disjunct distribution of species of H. (Brachipposideros) suggests that representatives of this subgenus will be found in at least tropical southern Asia. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 12, Fasc. 5 (1982)

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Contributions à l'étude des micromammifères du gisement Miocène supérieur de Montredon (Hérault). 4 - Les chiroptères
Bernard Sigé
Keywords: Chiroptera; Hérault; Late Miocene; Micromammals; Montredon
 
  Abstract

    The Montredon local fauna yielded very rare bats, represented by damaged isolated teeth. Only a few documents are available for this period of the European Neogene. ln this poor state of knowledge, the material represents three undetermined species, a supposed molossid and two vespertilionids. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 12, Fasc. 3 (1982)

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Compléments sur les Chiroptères de l'Eocène moyen d'Europe. Les genres Palaeochiropteryx et Cecilionycteris.
Bernard Sigé and Donald E. Russell
Keywords: Chiroptera; Geiseltal; Messel; Middle Eocene
 
  Abstract

    New dental and skeletal material referable to Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon from the Middle Eocene locality of
    Messel (G.F.R.) is studied, which provides additions to the previously gained knowledge of this european genus. Dental specimens from Geiseltal (G.D.R.), also of Middle Eocene age, allow us to analyze Cecilionycteria prisca. Some of these are separated to establish a new genus, Matthesia, and two new species, M. germanica and M. ? insolita


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 9, Ext (1980)

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Données nouvelles sur le genre Stehlinia (Vespertilionoidea, Chiroptera) du Paléocène d'Europe
Bernard Sigé
Keywords: Chiroptera; Palaeocene; Vespertilionoidea
 
  Abstract

    Abstract not available 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 06, Fasc. 3-4 (1975)

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Anatomie du membre antérieur chez un chiroptère Molossidé (Tadarida sp.) du Stampien de Cereste (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence).
Bernard Sigé
Keywords: Chiroptera; Molossidae; Oligocene

doi: 10.18563/pv.4.1.1-38
 
  Abstract

    The present study describes in detail the anterior limb osteology of a molossid chiropteran of the genus Tadarida, from Céreste, a Stampian locality in the Apt-Forcalquier Oligocene basin already known for its fishes, plants and insects.

    A comparision with the Miocene forms T. srehlini from Saint-Géraud localities and T. sp. from Württemberg, also with the recent forms T. teniotis and Eumops perotis, does not show any clear morphological differences between the Tertiary and Recent Tadarida, indicating a rather noticeable anatomical stability, not exceptionnal indeed among Chiropterans. The Céreste fossil exhibits however slightly primitive wing proportions if compared to the Saint Gérand Aquitanian species.

    Several remarks deal with the peculiar relationships between the ecology of the molossids and their kind of fossilisation, frequently associated with sedimentary facies of the lacustrine type.
      


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 04, Fasc. 1 (1971)

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Révision des Chiroptères Lutériens de Messel (Hesse, Allemagne).
Donald E. Russell and Bernard Sigé
Keywords: Chiroptera; Lutetian; Messel

doi: 10.18563/pv.3.4.83-182
 
  Abstract

    The revision of the Lutetian chiropterans from Messel, first described by Revilliod in 1917, is based on the anatomy of the teeth and the skeleton.  A figuration or refiguration of thematerial utilized accompanies the new description, which goes beyond that of the original monograph.
    The study shows a certain variability of the dental structure within the genera Palaeochiropteryx Revilliod and Archaeonycteris Revilliod,  as well as a general resemblance of the two forms. The morphology of the teeth permits, however, the verification of the validity of the different species: Palaeochiropteryx tupaiodon Revilliod, P. spiegeli Revilliod, Archaeonycterís trigonodon Revilliod, and Archaeonycteris revilliodi, n. sp.
    Some differences of the skeletal and dental anatomy tend to indicate a stage of evolution less advanced for the genus Archaeonycteris.
    The comparison of the chiropterans of Messel with the principal groups of living chiropterans, as well as with different Eocene fossíls (notably Cecílionycteris Heller and Icaronycteris Jepsen) leads to a more precise idea of the anatomy of primitive chiropterans. This comparison also permits the proposition that the oid forms so far described by integrated in a superfamily, the Palaeochiropterygoidea and allows   a general phylogenetic hypothesis to be advanced for the order Chiroptera. 


  Article infos

Published in Vol. 03, Fasc. 4 (1970)

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